Posts Tagged FastPictureViewer Professional

Church Location Portraits

Church Location Portraits

Church location portraits

Church location portraits

It has been about 11 months since I last updated this site. I hope to catch everyone up soon as to what’s been going on. For now, my church asked me to add some more officers and staff location portraits to our site at Grace Community Church (PCA). No problem, except it has been about a year since I last shot there, and I still wanted the images to look as though they all belonged together.

I normally shoot location portraits with 5 lights (key, fill, background, hair, and rim). I shot these images with only a 46″ Photek Softlighter II as a key, and a 60″ Photek Softlighter II as a fill and spill onto the background, both with nylon diffusers.

I think I came pretty close to matching the previous images here.

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Church Web Images

Church Web Images

Church Web Images

Church Web Images

My wife and I are new members of Grace Community Church (http://www.cvillegrace.org/) in Charlottesville, VA. GCC is a PCA (Presbyterian Church in America) church, located 4 miles north of the Charlottesville airport and just off of 29 North. Coming from Charlottesville, just look for the Psychic on the right (not kidding!), then make the next left onto Dickerson and follow the signs.

We were drawn to the sound, winsome, honest, and transparent teaching of Don Ward and Tag Tuck. I am honored to be part of a team that has been working on Grace Community Church‘s new website. These are some images for the site, which rolled out today.

I want the images to honor God, be interesting, and communicate who we are. More images are certainly needed, but I am pleased with the first batch.

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Sunset Panoramic from Buckhead Loop

Sunset Panoramic from Buckhead Loop

I have a lot of great sunrise and sunset panoramic images of Buckhead, but I have been missing one of the great views; that from Buckhead Loop looking southeast. Fortunately, that changed this month, and I was granted access to the roof of SpringHill Suites by Marriott. On the shoot day the weather was perfect, the General Manager was very agreeable, and his maintenance man Rob was extremely helpful in getting me up as high on the roof as possible.

Sunset panoramic photography:  the process

Sunset panoramic photography involves capturing several individual photos that will be “stitched” together in software to make a larger image. Photographing sunset panoramics is different than normal daylight panos…  the light just before and after sunset changes very quickly. To get a final image that looks correct, I try to avoid making more than one pan of the camera (tilting it up, and making another pan to catch the tops of buildings takes too long, and the light changes too quickly). For this shoot 24mm was the optimal focal length. I began with my 24-70mm/2.8 lens but eventually switched to the 14-24mm/2.8, a proven great lens, since I might have wanted to shoot a wider angle than 24mm (I didn’t ). Once I had my Nodal Ninja Ultimate M1-L panoramic head levelled, I just waited for the light to become magic.

Since I shoot tethered to my laptop, I constantly judge the histogram and check for over exposed areas in FastPictureViewer Pro. For nighttime shots, I strive to do 2 things:  1) get the most vibrant colors possible while still having separation between the buildings and the sky, and 2) get some great streaking car lights. For this location, the vibrancy is pretty good in the last 2 images, but the car lights are overexposed due to the brightness of the lights at the intersection and the shopping center parking lot. To keep from overexposing those areas I was limited to 2.5 seconds exposure… not nearly long enough to record light streaks from the cars.

Because of my location on the roof, once I was up there, I was stuck for the duration of the shoot! That was over 4 hours!! (I included the extra “!” for the condition of my bladder at the end of the shoot.)

Sunset panoramic photography:  fast changing light

Sunset – 1 hour 10 minutes

Sunset + 11 minutes

Sunset + 20 minutes

Sunset + 25 minutes. Exposure:  2.5 seconds, f/13, ISO 200, Nikon 14-24mm lens at 24mm. 9 images captured angle of view of about 270 degrees (this image is cropped).

 To view larger images of these shots click one these thumbnails:  .

The last 2 weeks have been very productive. I have lined up several new unique locations and have shot several sunrise and sunset panos. I hope to get some more posts up soon, but for now please see some of these new shots in my panoramic portfolio.

 

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